The Will and Desire of Corporations

It’s really easy to blame corporations. Corporations can be big, evil, and swallow up other companies in their wake. They can exploit, push down, discriminate, and do all of the things that we hate to see people or organizations doing. But why do they do it?

I’m of the belief that the majority of people aren’t evil, exploitative, discriminatory, or mean-spirited. I don’t even believe that the majority of people are greedy enough to manipulate people to get their way. So if people aren’t evil, and people make up corporations, how are corporations so evil?

AT A CERTAIN POINT, THE CORPORATIONS START RUNNING THE PEOPLE, AND THE PEOPLE STOP RUNNING THE CORPORATION.

Corporations have one goal: to make money. They will do everything they can to make money. They are not human, and they have no morals or feelings… all they have is numbers, productivity, efficiency, and profit. Is that bad though? Well, not necessarily.

This post was inspired by a cool game that I saw called paperclips. You can play it for free, online, here. The game is about making paperclips. First, you make one. Then you make more. Then you buy an auto-clipper, which makes paperclips for you automatically every second. Then more auto-clippers. Then you research to improve your auto-clipper efficiency. Then you research even more to make even more paperclips. I haven’t played a ton of the game, but suffice it to say that taking over the world isn’t even the end of the game.

The lesson learned from this game is that it’s not the people who are growing corporations to an insane degree, or being evil through their greedy business practices. At a certain point, a company becomes large enough that it has its own goals, and its own desires. As we can see from the paperclip game, the point where the spirit of the company moves from person to non-human entity can be pretty quick. The corporation then has the goal to make money, to grow, to take more market share (to make more money), to hire people, to fire people, to find cheap labour, to find new markets… it’s rare that all of these decisions are being made by one single person.

As early 20th century American writer Ambrose Bierce put it:

“CORPORATION: AN INGENIOUS DEVICE FOR OBTAINING PROFIT WITHOUT INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY.”

This isn’t to say that all of the people in corporations are wonderful and generous people, and it’s not to say that there aren’t some leaders of businesses who actually do evil things for their own benefit. But it is important to note that it’s easy, especially for groups, to make decisions “for the corporation” even if those decisions are not perfectly aligned with one’s own morals.

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As much as it’s easy to hide behind the guise of a corporation to make decisions that might be questionable, it also allows us to blame and hate corporations vehemently in an unreasonable fashion, and without feeling bad about it. It’s fairly well known that one of the easiest ways to justify feelings of hatred, anger or violence is by dehumanizing the person or thing that you’re mad at. People do this all of the time for corporations and might not hesitate to say that a corporation should be burned to the ground, destroyed, or dismantled without considering the human element. Dehumanization is a two-way street, and as much as you can hide behind the wall of anonymity in a large corporation, you can also hate unreasonably and without hesitation.

Companies, big and small, need to be mindful and careful to not get too carried away by the will of the corporation. Business owners, employees, and customers / uninvolved people need to be aware that this can happen, it can happen easily, and that it’s important for the people to keep control of the corporation. Our company is small, and doesn’t plan to become huge any time soon, but we aim to keep that human element and are always careful to be aware of it. If you stay human, the company will stay human, and people will recognize the corporation as having human values.

Cuphead Isn’t Ashamed of Being a Video Game

If you haven’t played the beautiful, 30’s era cartoon-inspired game Cuphead yet, then you should. It’s an extremely challenging platformer shooter made up of a slew of intense boss fights mixed with some run ‘n’ gun levels as well. You can check it out on Steam here, and I’ll put the trailer below for reference.

I’m not here to review games however, as there are a bajillion other people who can do that better than I can. What I wanted to talk about today was one of the many things that Cuphead does right, beyond its precision platforming, innovative art style and skill progression. One of the things that I noticed is that:

CUPHEAD ISN’T ASHAMED OF BEING A VIDEO GAME. THE GAME DOESN’T MAKE EXCUSES.

 

The game presents the player with an extremely clear, simple motivation right at the start and explains why you need to fight all of these bosses. Next, an elder (your grandfather, maybe? I don’t remember) tells you he can bestow upon you some super-power that makes you shoot from your hands. What?

The answer to that “What?” is that it doesn’t matter. At all. You know why you’ve bought this game and why you’re playing it. The developers know why you’ve bought this game and why you’re playing it. Why should the game need to go and make excuses about what it does and why? The game should also know that you’ve bought this game, and it should definitely know why you’re playing it.

An example of what might have been done in another game would be that you would be told some elaborate explanation of the lore and the justification behind these super-powers, or you might be sent on some sort of process to figure them out. Once you get this ability (to shoot), you’re sent to a tutorial, which pretty clearly states that it’s a tutorial. Again, no bullshit. You’re in a game, playing a tutorial. That’s it. You’re not playing through what is an obvious tutorial, while the game attempts to hide it by pretending it’s a a part of the story or making up another excuse as to why you can, for example, swing a sword at people infinitely but never die.

The final example of this is when an ability is unlocked or purchased. Forget the fact that you can buy new “weapons” even though it’s just your hands shooting stuff; it also tells you “Press Y to equip your new weapon” or something similar. Clearly, you’re in a video game and need to know how to play.

I won’t claim that all games should be this up-front about everything they do: motivation, control, tutorial, etc. Different strategies work for different games, and each game has their way of doing things. But it was a nice relief to see this kind of approach after playing many games which try to pretend that everything has to make sense within the world of the game, as opposed to admitting that they’re video games and that people need to understand how things work, even if it breaks the “immersion”.

Anyway, go check out the game. It’s doing amazingly well and with good reason, so give credit to the folks over at Studio MDHR.

Next Steps for the Subscription Model?

It’s no secret that a ton of services and software have moved to a subscription-based model and are having amazing success with it. A subscription-based model, when talking about products or services, basically means that you pay a subscription fee (monthly, usually) to access the product or the software you want to use. Traditionally, software was sold in a packaged bundle: pay $199.99 for this accounting software and have it forever. I’ll talk quickly about why the shift is happening, and then expand on some ideas of where I think it might go.

Why the shift away from the traditional model?

Updates

Back in the day (i.e. a few years ago), you had to buy a CD with a software on it, put it in your CD-ROM drive (ha!) and install the software. When an update came out, you had to buy the new version… Office 2003, Office 2005, etc. This made sense, because updates weren’t super quick, and it was like buying a new pair of shoes; you buy what you need now, and by the time you’re ready for a new pair, new technology has come out.

Nowadays, patches for software are coming out on an almost weekly basis, and new features are being added to existing products all the time. There’s no longer a need for CD-ROM drives as you can download the newest version from the web, and this means that companies can update their products quickly and efficiently. This can work with the traditional model; you buy a license key and then sign in to your account online to download the updates, but it comes with security risks and a logistical hassle when you need to manage users and keys.

 

Less Risk for the Buyer

For the customer, there’s less risk in trying out a product for $30 for a month as opposed to buying it for $720 and expecting to use it for two years. This is pretty obvious, and makes it easy for consumers to make an educated choice.

 

Increase in Product Quality

This isn’t an argument that directly helps the service providers or product creators, but I think it’s something that naturally evolved due to competition. You can no longer sell your product based on bullet point descriptions and images, because people get to try it without committing a huge amount of money. That means that the quality bar is raised, and now when people start using your program or software, they need to be presented with a fully functional, easy-to-use solution.

What’s Next?

We’ve already seen a ton of games move to a subscription model, as well as the online play portion of console games. Our accounting software that we use at Clever Endeavour Games (the games company where I work) is subscription based, as is our website hosting, email management (Google for business), the game engine we use, etc. Almost all of these things used to have a fixed price that you would pay at once, and they’re all moving away.

But what happens after this? What industries can you think about that are currently selling products in a traditional way, that might move to subscription models soon?

The first one I’m thinking of is transportation. There’s already a lease system, which is somewhere between rental / subscription and purchasing. But with things like Communauto (here in Montreal), people can register to the service for a monthly or yearly fee, and take a car wherever they want. They don’t own anything, just a license to take the car from point A to point B and forget about it. Imagine a world where you could take any kind of car you’d like, have it pick you up and drop you off where you’d like, and all it required was a monthly subscription… I think this is next once we have consistent self-driving cars.

Next thing is clothing. Wait what? Why would you want to wear clothes used by someone else? Well… you already do. People rent tuxedos for weddings, ball gowns, and elaborate Halloween costumes. If you’re looking for the perfect outfit for your night out, why be limited to the clothes you own? Imagine being able to pick up whatever you wanted from a huge catalog, and the clothes were clean every time you wanted to wear them? This wouldn’t be for every day of course, but I could definitely see its potential for special events in the future.

Flights might also be something that could be subscription based… if you’re someone who flies often or in some sort of consistent manner, it might be easier to simply pay a yearly or monthly fee and be free to fly wherever you want.

This all came up because I’m going to soon be starting to pay a subscription for a virtual instrument pack for music production, which costs $25/mo. This is instead of a software which costs around $900, and requires a $200 update every year. The goal of the subscription-based model is that they can update the instruments more often, and as long as you’re signed up, you can open projects which use those instruments. For me, I get to try it for $25 and see if I want to continue. For them, they can rope me in by offering me over $900 of value worth of instruments, and keep me longer term if I like it.

Anyway, just some food for thought. It’s incredible how obvious this kind of thing seems, but it took a while since the internet was a thing to actually start taking over. Let’s see what the future has in store for us!

Thoughts from my Peru Trip

I don’t want to make this a blog post like any old travel blog, because there are enough of those around, and there are people who have documented similar Peru trips with more eloquent writing and captivating tales. But I did jot down some of the things that struck me about my trip, some things that aren’t the usual “wow mountains are beautiful” thoughts. Below are some of my findings / thoughts about some things I noticed on my Peru trip. And here’s a llama.

The Rich and the Poor

The difference between the rich and the poor in the cities in Peru (Lima, Arequipa most noticeably) was massive. You can look at a beautiful house in the city with barbed wire and an electric fence surrounding it, with heavy gates and iron bars on the windows, then look across the street to where you see a shack made of scrap metal and a tarp. From Mercedes cars and brand name shoes to dirt floors and no running water, and you literally need only to look across the street. This might be the work of corruption in government, exploitation of the poor for work, or some other causes that I won’t claim to be able to explain. But it really puts in perspective the complaints about the discrepancy between rich and poor here in Canada, and the disappearance of the middle class. I don’t believe we have anything close to what they have in Peru, and I’m sure that we never will, because the government does a good job to try to protect and give opportunity to the middle class in my opinion.

Catholicism… but Why?

Peruvians are super Catholic. Most of South America is super Catholic in fact, which of course came from the Spanish when they invaded / colonized in the 13th and 14th centuries. My initial response to this was “Why?? Didn’t they come in and kill all of your people and destroy your religion? Why do you like them?” The answer is twofold. The first reason is time… it’s been many generations since the first conquistadores (conquerors) and people have learned over time to appreciate the Catholicism that was forced upon them before. The second reason, which I find way more interesting, was the way in which the Spanish convinced the native South Americans to follow them.

You’ll notice in the churches in Peru, that the vast majority are more focused on the Virgin Mary than they are on Jesus. This was odd to me, after having seen churches in Europe where there’s a huge focus on Jesus. What was explained to me is that the Spanish told the natives (Inca, mostly, in this case) was that their gods (Pachamama: Mother Earth, Inti: the sun god, etc.) were represented in Christianity, but represented differently. For example, the Virgin Mary was Mother Earth because she gave life, and this was one of the Inca’s most important gods. Instead of praying to Pachamama, they could now pray to the Virgin Mary and their prayers would still be heard. Another great example of this, which I find fascinating, is the link between the thunder god Illapa and the Catholic St. James. It’s said that during a battle, a certain Spanish conquistador riding a horse came through a city and killed hundreds of Incas. I asked how anyone could erect a statue or sanctify a man who slaughtered their people, and the answer was this: apparently, there was a great thunderstorm when the battle took place and the Incas believed / reasoned that this man was the image of Illapa, the thunder god, who punished the people for their wrongdoings.

I found this really interesting… I’m not sure if they had forced Catholic schools like the English set up in Canada and Australia, but this was some interesting knowledge to acquire.

The Indigenous People and Traditional Wares

There are indigenous people who still live in small villages in the mountains, and still keep their traditions and their clothing. It’s wonderful, and being able to see some of those people and how they go about their daily lives is great. But did I actually see that? I’d guess not. I’d guess that very few tourists have ever seen that. What we see is a dramatization, by people who might actually be authentic villagers, but they’re doing it mostly for tourist money. That’s not to say that the learning isn’t important, but we do have to consider that “authenticity” in these situations.

A good example of this is the markets. There are traditional markets in certain cities, and they’re full of stuff. Scarves, hats, gloves, paintings, everything you’d imagine seeing at a crafts market. One problem… they all have the same stuff. ALL OF THEM. The markets in Lima are the same as the ones in Cusco, which are the same as the ones in Arequipa. Same stuff, same “handmade, 100% alpaca wool” stuff. I learned from a Peruvian business owner there that they are indeed handmade, and they are indeed made in Peru, and that they’re definitely not alpaca. Well, not all of them are handmade… but when they are, it’s not in a small village in the mountains. It’s in a massive factory owned by one of two companies that share practically 100% of the market.

I think the trip helped make me aware of what’s true and not true, and that even if you speak Spanish, tourism makes a ton of money for the people and it doesn’t need to be authentic to make money. But there are two more important things that I realized. First,

EVEN IF THE MERCHANDISE IS NOT AUTHENTIC, BUYING IT STILL HELPS THE LOCALS LIVE, AND THE MEMORY OF THE COUNTRY WITH WHICH YOU’VE ASSOCIATED IT IS NO LESS MEANINGFUL.

Second, in most situations when a Canadian has the money to travel to Peru, the people selling the merchandise need the money more than you (we) do. That is to say, haggling to get something for $6 instead of $8 makes a much bigger difference in the lives of the merchant than it does to you, and it’s something to consider when shopping in those places. Of course if people are charging ridiculous prices there’s a point where it becomes unfair and exploitative, so you just need to know when you’re getting screwed vs. when you’re helping someone put food on their table.

Some Slightly More Random Thoughts

The roads in Peru… in fact the roads everywhere I’ve been, are still better than in Montreal. Basically, if a road in the world is paved, or has ever been paved, it’s better than Montreal roads. You’d think side-streets in a small town in Peru, or in Cambodia for that matter, would be bad. Nope. Montreal is still the worst.

Every city has sketchy areas, but it’s not a big deal! People warned me about the danger in Peru, and I can honestly say that at no point during my entire trip did I feel even the slightest bit uncomfortable or like I was in danger. Keep your wits about you, do some research, and you’ll know to avoid the dangerous places. It’s the same thing in any city… there are dangerous areas of Montreal too but no tourist would ever go there unless they’re clueless.

Stray dogs are super cute. Well all dogs are super cute, but the strays in Peru were super cute, and looked to be significantly healthier than some of the dogs I’ve seen on other travels. It made me think about the dog situation and whether it’s actually better to euthanize tons of animals every year to avoid the situation getting out of control. I’m kind of torn on the matter; having strays leads to more strays which leads to more strays and eventually areas of the city can become dangerous to walk your own, non-stray dog. It also means that disease can abound and can make its way to your dog, not to mention the fact that strays won’t be spayed or neutered and your dog could be at risk of getting pregnant. Still not sure where I stand, but personally I liked the fact that cute dogs roamed around all over the place and didn’t pose a threat to anyone (except for maybe eating their garbage).

 

That’s all for today! Hope you enjoyed 🙂

Virtue Theory, and my First Proper Philosophy Post

Today, I’d like to introduce something called virtue theory, which was on of Aristotle’s ways of saying that we should be good people and happiness will follow. More specifically, virtue theory is based on the idea that nature has built into us the desire to be virtuous, and just like the innate purpose of a flower is to grow and spread its pollen and reproduce, Aristotle believed that our innate purpose can be found through virtuosity.

But what does it mean to “be virtuous”?

Virtuosity, in this case, basically means doing the right thing at the right time, treating people the right way, and knowing how to handle yourself in situations through judgment and understanding. This is, obviously, quite vague.

Let’s dig into this a little bit though… what is the “right” way to handle yourself in all situations? You would think that this could be pretty subjective. But in Aristotle’s view, there was something he called the Golden Mean, which is the midpoint between two extremes; the common example used here is the virtue of courage. A virtuous person is courageous, but in virtue theory one must sit in-between the extremes of being not courageous enough (cowardly) and being too courageous (reckless). Another example might be the midpoint between stinginess (cheapness) and prodigality (excessive spending), the virtue one would call generosity. Making millions of dollars but not helping someone who is in dire need would be cheap and cruel, while spending all of your rent money buying rounds for random people at the bar would be idiotic and irrational. Somewhere in the middle one can find the “right” generosity, giving to those in need but not spending excessively on useless things. Not that beer is useless… but you know. Not if you’re spending rent money.

But where this golden mean lies could be different in everyone’s opinion. So how does this concept help anyone? Well, understanding the virtues in the situations presented to you and being able to identify where others lie on the scale will help you to develop habits that lead you to become a virtuous person. For example, you’re at a networking event (just drawing from my experience here…) and you’re in a conversation with two people who just met each other. One person starts divulging some information about their issues in their relationship with their mother, and the other person starts being visibly uncomfortable. You can learn from this: when meeting someone new for the first time, be careful when talking about highly personal things because it might not be the right time or place for it. Through life experience and by copying those who we respect and trust, we find where our golden mean is. Extrapolating a bit from this, you could say that the entire construction of your moral compass comes from watching your parents and other influences as you approach your golden mean.

And why would you want to become virtuous? What’s the point?

Eudaimonia: nope, it’s not a deadly disease. Eudaimonia is a state of being which could be seen as the ultimate state of happiness, and sometimes is translated from Greek as “human flourishing”. Living a eudaimonistic life means that you’ll be constantly improving yourself and your way of being, but means that you will also find true happiness, according to the theory.

And why would we want that? Isn’t it easier to just live life without thinking about all this stuff? Well, yes. But that kind of life could never reach the level of satisfaction of the life of someone who practices or is at least aware of these kinds of virtues and strives to improve upon them. Also, according to Aristotle, the kind of person who tries to achieve eudaimonia is the kind of person who will do good things, help people, and make others happy. Seems to me like it’s worth thinking about, which is why I’m sharing this knowledge today.

I’ve taken a great interest in philosophy and psychology recently, and I’d like to start writing more about them. I don’t have a degree in either of those fields, but I’ve read up a lot about it and I find it useful to talk about how that learning can affect the everyday life of someone who isn’t a scholar in those subjects.

More to come!

References:
Crash Course Philosophy: Virtue Theory
Eudaimonia - Philosophy Basics
Golden Mean - Wikipedia

If You Can’t Clean Your Room, Don’t Try to Change the World

“If you can’t clean your room, don’t try to change the world.” This quote is from the amazing Dr. Jordan Peterson, a clinical psychologist and teacher of psychology at University of Toronto.

This quote comes from the idea that if you want to change the world, you have to start from yourself and work outward. It sounds airy and high-level, but it has examples in the real world. For example, many people try to solve problems that they know nothing about, unaware or not admitting that they can’t sort out their own shit and then trying to fix the world as an escape.

2017-05-27 Lake

I’m not suggesting that people should hold their thoughts inside and not talk about relevant issues, not at all. What I am saying however is that people should do two things: find ways to make the necessary changes within themselves, and be aware of what they know and understand.

Making the necessary changes within themselves implies being aware of their thoughts, opinions, and problems and where they stem from. It also implies trying to understand why they have such thoughts and opinions and trying to justify them, while trying to rectify problems so that they can influence people outside themselves in an epistemological way.

Being aware of what people know and understand is equally important in trying to enact change. I agree with Dr. Peterson when he says that an 18 year old with a half-finished college education in life sciences shouldn’t be trying to change the entire economic system (not verbatim). Furthermore, the way this seems to take place (especially in universities nowadays) is with picket signs, denial of free speech (in Peterson’s case), and unfounded pent-up hate for authority, which doesn’t help their cause in my opinion. I can’t say I have an academic source for this, but I rely on my experience and the knowledge of people smarter than me in saying: Many of the young people who are the most intense activists and try to “fix up other people” are the ones with the gravest internal problems and least clear ideologies, and this is something we (and they) should be aware of.

2017-05-27 Protest

A smart man that you may have heard of, Mahatma Gandhi, said something that I think can be interpreted similarly: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” This implies that you must change yourself in order to influence the world around you. Peterson also references an old quote, this one from the bible (Matthew 7:3). Whether or not you’re a religious person, this idea has clearly been around for a while and is something that we should consider:

Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own?

On a more personal level, what I realized this does is that it calls into question your own beliefs, and forces you to think about them and justify them, if only to yourself. Why do you think the way you do? Why do you act in a way contrary to what you consider your moral belief system, and why do you try to convince people of things you might not even know to be true? I won’t claim that I’m a perfect person or that every single thing I say is 100% proven to be true, but being aware of these things can go a long way toward getting there (or close, because really no one can ever be perfect).

2017-05-27 Problems

This could go on and on about accepting responsibility for yourself and your actions, determining your moral compass, learning and sharing information, etc. etc. but you’ll all fall asleep before it’s over, so I’ll stop this here. I don’t need to be “teaching a lesson” in this blog, but if you wanted something to take from it, I’d suggest this: figure out your own shit before you tell people how to live their lives or view the world.

Being Your Own Boss: Some Things I’ve Learned

In starting my game development studio with two partners, I’ve learned a lot of things. Today I wanted to talk about what I’ve learned while being my own boss (or at least being 1/3 my own boss).

Self-Motivate and Have Discipline

Last year I wrote about How to Not Explode When Working From Home, which was just one of the pieces of motivation and discipline needed when running your own show.

The first key to staying motivated is to set short-term and long-term goals, and to always keep them in mind (or better yet, written down somewhere). It’s extremely daunting to think about creating a whole project without seeing the steps along the way, and writing the steps (and organizing them well) means that the amount of motivation needed is only what’s needed to get to the next step.

2017-04-19 Mountain

The next important thing is staying disciplined. If seeing the short-term and long-term goals leads to motivation, the discipline to follow through with the steps consistently and without excuses is what actually moves the project along. I can’t say I have the secret to staying disciplined, but each person has their workflow that keeps them in line. Find your routine and the thing that keeps you working consistently and focused. For some people, working from home is too distracting. For others, skipping the gym in the morning means they won’t be focused. Especially when you’re not directly reporting to someone, it can be easy to let deadlines slip, to put work off till “later”, and to lose sight of goals both short-term and long-term.

Separate Work From Rest-Of-Life

I was able to do this fairly early on after starting our company; in less than a year or so, I managed to separate work from the rest of my life in a way that I feel has been successful and satisfactory (but maybe I should ask the people around me if that’s the case…). I see a lot of people, even people who aren’t their own bosses, bringing their work along with them everywhere. I was in the car with a friend on the way to an event on a Saturday night and they were on the phone talking about a business deal. No one should ever be expected to be doing business deals at 9pm on a Saturday night, and if you’re your own boss, you actually have a choice.

2017-04-19 LateWork

You can choose when you’re “on” and when you’re “off”, and no one is expecting you to answer them at that time, unless you get in that habit from the start. If, when starting your company, you get super excited about every opportunity (which you should) and answer emails at midnight on a weekend, so be it. But realize that if this becomes the norm, this will become expected of you by your business partners, employees, suppliers, etc.

To make sure that you maintain your relationships with friends and loved ones, you absolutely need to make sure that you’re making time for people that are important for you and that might mean giving yourself a hard limit of when you’re “on”. For me, I decided not to answer work emails after 7pm. I’ll check them sometimes, and if they’re extremely important, I can make exceptions, but for the most part if someone is waiting on an answer for something, they can wait until the next morning. It’s more important that I spend time with people who matter and don’t become one of those 80h/week startup people.

Set the Example

Realize that the people around you and eventually the people working for you are following your example in terms of how hard you’re working, how disciplined you are, your accountability, and how much you care about your work. This seems to happen more later in life (or as owners have had their companies for a long time), but the divide between employee and owner increases when the owners don’t show that they’re doing important work.

Ducks crossing road

I was working at a lighting firm doing engineering before getting into the games industry, and while the bosses weren’t making engineering drawings or cutting lenses for light fixtures, you could see them doing hard work. They were in meetings, they were on the floor talking to the assembly team, they were asking us if there was something they can do to make our lives easier, and they were generally showing (in one way or another) that the work they were doing was because they care. If employees feel like their bosses are using them as money-generation tools without contributing to the products or services themselves, it causes a divide which leads to resentment.

Treat Your Employees Like You Treat Yourself

This one is tied closely to the previous point; being your own boss means that you have certain privileges that most people don’t have. Be thankful for the advantages that you have, such as leaving early because you have a doctor appointment and not worrying about being looked down upon or judged. Being thankful for these kinds of things and being aware of how it feels will lead to the understanding of what it feels like on the other side, as an employee who might feel some unnecessary pressure. Not sure why this picture is relevant, but it looks like freedom and a cute puppy so I can’t not include it here.

2017-04-19 Freedom

If you treat your employees like you treat yourself (or as closely as possible), I think you’ll see an increase in respect from partners and employees alike, which will in turn lead to better work from those people. Reward them for doing good work, treat them as people who have responsibilities and problems outside of their work lives and not just as numbers or money-printing machines (unless they literally are money-printing machines), and I would bet that the net outcome is positive for you and your company.

This became much longer than anticipated. In short, being your own boss is awesome, and despite the lack of security and the pressure of knowing that if you screw up then you don’t eat, the success, accomplishment, money, etc. feels great knowing that the energy put in directly results in the rewards you receive.